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Why you should put down your drink and light one up intead – it’s healthier

Why you should put down your drink and light one up intead – it’s healthier

By Ted Hesson at ABC News

July 26, 2013

The ad mentioned below was pulled by Grazie Media, the company airing it, according to a press release from the Marijuana Policy Project.

Nobody has ever died from an overdose of cannabis ever and there is no pain relieving medicine less toxic than cannabis.  Additionally, it is now fairly accepted that cannabis smoke is much less carcinogenic than tobacco smoke.  Let’s stop this nonsense and madness and heal our culture together.  Cannabis is good medicine and even very poor people can afford it in places where it is now legal.  -Dr. Jake Felice

You’ve heard how legalizing marijuana could bring in tax dollars and reduce the damage caused by the war on drugs.  Now there’s a new pot message hitting the mainstream: Weed is safer than alcohol.

A video ad created by the Marijuana Policy Project, which wants to change drug laws, will play outside a NASCAR race in Indianapolis this weekend. It puts marijuana side-by-side with booze, making the case that cannabis is the more responsible recreational drug.

“If you’re an adult who enjoys a good beer, there’s a similar product you might wanna know about,” the video narrator says. “One without all the calories and serious health problems. Less toxic, so it doesn’t cause hangovers or overdose deaths, and it’s not linked to violence or reckless behavior.”

“Marijuana, less harmful than alcohol, and time to treat it that way,” the video concludes.

Mason Tvert, communications director for the Marijuana Policy Project, explains why they chose the auto racing event to launch the ad.

“Many adults will be enjoying a beer or two at the race this weekend, and we want them to think about the fact that marijuana is an objectively less harmful product,” Tvert wrote in an email. “Most importantly, we hope racing fans who still think marijuana should be illegal will question the logic of punishing adults for using a safer substance than those produced by sponsors of NASCAR events and racing teams.”

There’s some convincing research behind the claim.

For example, there are an average of 37,000 deaths per year related to alcohol use (and that doesn’t include alcohol-related accidents), according to the Center for Disease Control (CDC). The government agency doesn’t track marijuana deaths, but some studies have found that pot has relatively few adverse clinical health effects.

And when it comes to toxicity and immediate death, one researcher found that marijuana was 100 times safer than alcohol or cocaine.

“Unfortunately, most Americans have been led to believe that marijuana is more harmful than it actually is,” Tvert said, “and as a result our laws have been based on misinformation.”

The NASCAR race where the ad will appear, called the Brickyard 400, is one of the biggest all year, and could draw upwards of 600,000 people, according to USA Today.

The space where the ad will be presented is actually outside the track, and therefore won’t be subject to review by NASCAR or the venue, the Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

 

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If you think drug companies want to make you healthy, watch this

If you think drug companies want to make you healthy, watch this

The topic of this video by Glen Olsen is one of the reasons why whole plant cannabis is so important – nobody has ever died from cannabis toxicity ever, and it is patent-free, affordable medicine for the people.  There are no patents for cannabis, and in the great state of Washington, patients with qualifying conditions are allowed to grow their own medicine, making it affordable even for people in the lowest income bracket.  I believe that a huge part of the push back against medical cannabis is because it dramatically reduces patient’s dependence on pharmaceutical drugs.

Nobody has ever died from an overdose of cannabis ever and there is no pain relieving medicine less toxic than cannabis.  Additionally, it is now fairly accepted that cannabis smoke is much less carcinogenic than tobacco smoke.  Let’s stop this nonsense and madness and heal our culture together.  Cannabis is good medicine and even very poor people can afford it in places where it is now legal.

-Dr. Jake Felice

 

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Complete remission of Crohn’s disease, improved sleep, appetite, and NO TOXICITY – welcome to the cannabis revolution

Complete remission of Crohn’s disease, improved sleep, appetite, and NO TOXICITY – welcome to the cannabis revolution

By Chris Weller at MedicalDaily

Crohn’s disease, one of several inflammatory bowel diseases, achieved “complete remission” in nearly half the subjects of one study that were exposed to smoking medical marijuana on a regular basis.

Smoking medical marijuana achieved remission in five of 11 subjects with Crohn’s disease who smoked twice a day for eight weeks, as part of a study.

Published in the journal Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the study examined the effects of consistent marijuana use on Crohn’s patients who suffered from severe cases of the disease. The results of the 21-subject study point toward the drug’s anti-inflammatory properties as being responsible for quieting symptoms in many patients, and even reaching total remission in others.

Mortar pestleThe Disease: Causes, Symptoms, And Treatments

Often mischaracterized as an autoimmune disease, Crohn’s disease is in fact an immune deficiency state. Arising from a host of genetic, environmental, and immunological factors, the disease causes a chronic inflammatory disorder that attacks the person’s gastrointestinal tract — anywhere from the mouth to the anus — in order to fight the body’s antigens that otherwise do no harm. Symptoms of the disease range from mild abdominal pain to more severe cases of bloody diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, weight loss, and fevers.

There is no cure for Crohn’s; however, various methods are aimed at limiting flare ups and keeping the disease in remission. Treatments, like disease severity, fall on a spectrum depending on the person. Simple dietary changes suffice for some, while invasive surgery to remove the affected area may be needed for others. Corticosteroids and other medications are also prescribed for less severe cases.

The disease affects around 400,000 to 600,000 people in North America, although many people do not get diagnosed until they’ve had the disease for years, simply because no symptoms were present.

The Study And Its Findings

Scientists at Meir Medical Center in Israel wanted to examine the effects of Cannabis sativa on patients with severe Crohn’s disease, relying on the underlying drug’s anti-inflammatory effects in treating other ailments, such as arthritis and multiple sclerosis.

“The marijuana plant Cannabis sativa has been reported to produce beneficial effects for patients with inflammatory bowel diseases, but this has not been investigated in controlled trials,” the researchers wrote. “We performed a prospective trial to determine whether cannabis can induce remission in patients with Crohn’s disease.”

Twenty-one people with severe, intractable Crohn’s comprised the study. Out of those 21, 11 subjects smoked two joints a day for eight weeks. The other 10 made up the placebo group.

The results were particularly telling, according to the researchers. In total, five of the 11 subjects smoking marijuana daily achieved total remission of their Crohn’s. They reported greater appetites and sleep patterns. (People with severe cases of Crohn’s sometimes defecate 20 times per day, and may even wake up at night to do so.) Moreover, “a clinical response” was found in 10 of those 11. Only four of the 10 placebo subjects reported any improvements.

These findings, argued the researchers, demonstrate how “THC-rich cannabis produced significant clinical, steroid-free benefits to 11 patients with active Crohn’s disease, compared with placebo, without side effects.”

The researchers were hesitant to call the study a total success, however, saying that the “primary end point of the study (induction of remission) was not achieved,” despite the five of 11 people who reported those effects.

Still, they noted that their findings merit further attention. “Further studies, with larger patient groups and a nonsmoking mode of intake, are warranted,” they wrote, pointing to the potentially diminished effects of smoking marijuana, as opposed to extracting the anti-inflammatory drugs directly from the plant.

Source: Naftali T, Lihi BL, Iris D. Cannabis Induces a Clinical Response in Patients With Crohn’s Disease: A Prospective Placebo-Controlled Study. Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. 2013.

 

 

 

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Medical marijuana and breast cancer – new research gives hope

Medical marijuana and breast cancer – new research gives hope

Chemo agents used to treat cancer are notoriously toxic to cancer patients.  Cannabis and cannabinoids such as CBD are at the forefront in the search for cancer cures, based not only on their potential effectiveness, but also on their extremely low toxicity.   -Dr. Jake Felice

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Cannabis helps patients forget PTSD night terrors

Cannabis helps patients forget PTSD night terrors

How in the world can forgetting be a useful thing? Well, it can be very helpful for us to forget traumatic events such as those that cause PTSD.  This can be a godsend for patients.  The majority of my Veterans with PTSD night terrors sleep through the night and also achieve relief from their night terrors on the first night.  Cannabis is a wonderful helper in integrating the memories of our painful past. The painful memories can be emotional as well as almost purely physical. Check out the amazing healing power of whole plant cannabis, and share with someone you love.  -Dr. Jake Felice

Here is another informative video on the benefits of cannabis for PTSD.  I hope that you enjoy and share this information with friends and loved ones.  -Dr. Jake Felice

In the video below, Dr. Sue Sisley Talks About Medical Marijuana and PTSD.  Another very informative video….  -Dr. Jake Felice

The following video a veteran discusses how cannabis has helped him on multiple levels, including overcoming his addiction to opiate based pain killers by his successful substitution of low toxic cannabis.

 

©2013 J. F. Felice, ND

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Is it legal to fly with cannabis?

Is it legal to fly with cannabis?

By Ben Livingston at The Stranger

Last October, medical pot patient Lori—who asked that we not use her last name since she can be fired for using marijuana—flew from Sea-Tac Airport to California while carrying her stash. “I didn’t want to get busted for smuggling or anything, so I called the TSA officer over, gave him my license, and let him know I was traveling with marijuana. He said, ‘no problem,’ and ushered me right through.”

Last month, she did the same thing at Sea-Tac Airport, but instead of allowing her past security without a scene, the screener pulled her aside and called in a TSA manager, who then called in the Port of Seattle police.

“They took a whole police report, but they didn’t confiscate anything,” Lori explains. “They told me that in three or four weeks I might get a letter from the prosecutor’s office, and there might be a fine.”

But Port of Seattle police sergeant Jason Coke is surprised by the case. “As far as we’re concerned, [cannabis] is personal property,” he says. Although certain personal property is banned on airplanes, he explains, pot isn’t, assuming it weighs less than the legal possession limit.

“This isn’t illegal for them to fly with,” Coke says.

Coke looked up Lori’s case and found records of her driver’s license, boarding pass, medical cannabis authorization, and stash of pot. He says port police generally report case outcomes to the TSA, and officers document the amount of pot—and that the person was legally entitled to possess it—to show the federal agency that police have done their due diligence, despite letting most fliers keep their cannabis. In Lori’s case, no report was sent to the King County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office, and he assures me the port police will do no such thing.

TSA spokeswoman Lorie Dankers says airport screeners don’t specifically search for illegal drugs. “If an officer discovers an item that may violate the law during security screening, even in states where marijuana is legal, TSA will refer the matter to law enforcement to make a determination on how to proceed.”

Sergeant Coke suggests a few practical tips when flying with cannabis: Don’t draw attention to yourself. Don’t have outstanding warrants. Carry it on, don’t check it—proving you qualify to legally possess pot is easier in person. And allow for an extra half-hour in case, as with Lori, police want to photograph your stash.

 

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