Uncategorized

Cannabis for migraines – a history of use in early 20th century medicine

Cannabis for migraines – a history of use in early 20th century medicine

For those of you interested in cannabis as a treatment for migraine headache, here’s an interesting video.  Dr. David Bearman discusses the early historical use of cannabis for migraine in the United States.  Enjoy, -Dr. Jake Felice

Share

Run From The Cure part 2

Run From The Cure part 2

Run From The Cure is one of the more impactful cannabis videos that I’ve seen.  It is one of the first videos that introduced me to the many uses of Rick Simpson oil.  Run From The Cure producer and director Christian Laurette is now raising funds for a second film.  Find out how you can help below and you can also click here to donate to the cause.  Enjoy….  -Dr. Jake Felice

From Lincoln Horsley at CureYourOwnCancer

“Run from the Cure: The Rick Simpson Story- A film by Christian Laurette” changed the world when it was released in 2008.  The film shows how Rick Simpson revived the cannabis oil medicine to use as a cure for cancer. It was groundbreaking because there was nothing else like it.  “Run from the Cure”  has been viewed millions of times by people all over the world and  translated into multiple languages.Fast forward 5 years and Christian feels it’s finally time for ‘Run from the Cure 2″.  His new documentary again will be available for FREE and will feature some great activists such as Rick Simpson (current figurehead of the global cannabis movement), Corrie Yelland, David Triplett, Shona Banda.  This time around though, Christian has decided to feature medical professionals as well. This will bring to light the science behind cannabis and cancer.  Some of the medical professionals will include Janet Sweeney PhD., Dr. Bob Melamede PhD. and Dennis Hill a bio chemist.
Continue reading here….
Share

If you think drug companies want to make you healthy, watch this

If you think drug companies want to make you healthy, watch this

The topic of this video by Glen Olsen is one of the reasons why whole plant cannabis is so important – nobody has ever died from cannabis toxicity ever, and it is patent-free, affordable medicine for the people.  There are no patents for cannabis, and in the great state of Washington, patients with qualifying conditions are allowed to grow their own medicine, making it affordable even for people in the lowest income bracket.  I believe that a huge part of the push back against medical cannabis is because it dramatically reduces patient’s dependence on pharmaceutical drugs.

Nobody has ever died from an overdose of cannabis ever and there is no pain relieving medicine less toxic than cannabis.  Additionally, it is now fairly accepted that cannabis smoke is much less carcinogenic than tobacco smoke.  Let’s stop this nonsense and madness and heal our culture together.  Cannabis is good medicine and even very poor people can afford it in places where it is now legal.

-Dr. Jake Felice

 

Share

Is it legal to fly with cannabis?

Is it legal to fly with cannabis?

By Ben Livingston at The Stranger

Last October, medical pot patient Lori—who asked that we not use her last name since she can be fired for using marijuana—flew from Sea-Tac Airport to California while carrying her stash. “I didn’t want to get busted for smuggling or anything, so I called the TSA officer over, gave him my license, and let him know I was traveling with marijuana. He said, ‘no problem,’ and ushered me right through.”

Last month, she did the same thing at Sea-Tac Airport, but instead of allowing her past security without a scene, the screener pulled her aside and called in a TSA manager, who then called in the Port of Seattle police.

“They took a whole police report, but they didn’t confiscate anything,” Lori explains. “They told me that in three or four weeks I might get a letter from the prosecutor’s office, and there might be a fine.”

But Port of Seattle police sergeant Jason Coke is surprised by the case. “As far as we’re concerned, [cannabis] is personal property,” he says. Although certain personal property is banned on airplanes, he explains, pot isn’t, assuming it weighs less than the legal possession limit.

“This isn’t illegal for them to fly with,” Coke says.

Coke looked up Lori’s case and found records of her driver’s license, boarding pass, medical cannabis authorization, and stash of pot. He says port police generally report case outcomes to the TSA, and officers document the amount of pot—and that the person was legally entitled to possess it—to show the federal agency that police have done their due diligence, despite letting most fliers keep their cannabis. In Lori’s case, no report was sent to the King County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office, and he assures me the port police will do no such thing.

TSA spokeswoman Lorie Dankers says airport screeners don’t specifically search for illegal drugs. “If an officer discovers an item that may violate the law during security screening, even in states where marijuana is legal, TSA will refer the matter to law enforcement to make a determination on how to proceed.”

Sergeant Coke suggests a few practical tips when flying with cannabis: Don’t draw attention to yourself. Don’t have outstanding warrants. Carry it on, don’t check it—proving you qualify to legally possess pot is easier in person. And allow for an extra half-hour in case, as with Lori, police want to photograph your stash.

 

Share

It’s gettin real in the WholeFoods parking lot…

It’s gettin real in the WholeFoods parking lot…

Share

Slow down, relax, take it easy…. Working long hours is bad for your heart

Slow down, relax, take it easy….  Working long hours is bad for your heart

People who regularly work long hours may be significantly increasing their risk of developing heart disease, the world’s biggest killer, British scientists said Monday.

Click here to read more

Share