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Hemp oil improves MS parameters

Hemp oil improves MS parameters

From NORML:

Tabriz, Iran: The consumption of hemp seed nutritional oil, in conjunction with the intake of evening primrose oils and a restricted diet high in hot-natured foods (such as pepper) and low in saturated fats and sugars, is associated with “significant improvement” in symptom management and immunological characteristics in subjects with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to clinical trial data published in the current issue of the scientific journal BioImpacts.

Researchers at the Tabriz University of Medical Sciences in Iran assessed the impact of hemp seed oil, evening primrose oils, and a restricted diet in 23 patients diagnosed with relapsing remitting MS. They reported that participants at the study’s completion “were healthier in comparison to baseline” and that “clinical and immunological parameters showed improvement in the patients after the intervention.” Authors acknowledged that hemp seed oil possesses potent antioxidative properties and also likely acts on specific signaling pathways that regulate inflammatory responses – two characteristics that would presumably make it beneficial in the treatment of MS.

Authors concluded: “After six months, significant improvements in extended disability status score were found. … Our data demonstrated that co-supplemented hemp seed and evening primrose oils with hot-natured diet intervention may decrease the risk of developing MS.”

Previously published clinical trials assessing the impact of inhaled cannabis and extracted organic cannabinoids in patients with MS have demonstrated that plant cannabinoids can alleviate disease symptoms – such as involuntary spasticity, neuropathy, and bladder dysfunction – and, in some subjects, may actually moderate disease progression. Nonetheless, the National MS Society shares little enthusiasm for the therapeutic use of either cannabis or cannabis-derived products as a treatment option for MS patients, stating on its website: “[B]ased on the studies to date – and the fact that long-term use of marijuana may be associated with significant, serious side effects – it is the opinion of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society’s Medical Advisory Board that there are currently insufficient data to recommend marijuana or its derivatives as a treatment for MS symptoms.”

 

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Ultra-low dose cannabis gives heart protection in mice

Ultra-low dose cannabis gives heart protection in mice

Could human hearts be protected by low dose cannabis?  A new study shows promise.  Mice, which received a very low dose of THC (0.002 mg per kg of body weight) before myocardial infarction (heart attack) showed a better outcome than non-treated mice. Researchers applied three forms of treatment: a single dose of THC 2 hours or 48 hours or continuous treatment over 3 weeks. All treatments were effective. They concluded that “a single ultra-low dose of THC before ischemia is a safe and effective treatment that reduces myocardial ischemic damage.”Heart hands
Felsenstein Medical Research Center, Rabin Medical Center, Petah Tiqwa, Israel.
Waldman M, et al. Biochem Pharmacol 2013;85(11):1626-33.

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Would prohibition be possible if cannabis was essential rather than illegal?

Would prohibition be possible if cannabis was essential rather than illegal?

Cannabis is the only agricultural crop that produces enough atmospheric monoterpenes to replace what’s been lost, in the time that we may have left to avoid extinction. Cannabis makes four times as much paper of higher quality than do trees. Cannabis is also the only common seed with three essential fatty acids, and the best available source of organic vegetable protein on Earth. Once the relationship between Cannabis and climate change has been made, then it will become obvious that our species must achieve a polar shift in values, in record time.

CO2worksThe boreal forests encircling the planet used to produce enough atmospheric aerosols (called “monoterpenes”) to protect the planet from solar UV-B radiation. Half of the northern forest regions have been cut, mostly to make paper. The rest of the trees are dying from continued logging, insect pest infestation and global temperature increase.

Time is the limiting factor in the equation of survival. We have nothing to fear but the atmosphere itself. If we fail to resolve problems of climate change then it won’t matter very much what we do mange to figure out.

Source: http://www.ted.com/conversations/10021/what_if_the_cannabis_plant_was.html

 

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Honey kills antibiotic resistant bacteria

Honey kills antibiotic resistant bacteria

Honey works fabulously for extracting topical cannabis products and edibles.  It has other wonderful properties in addition to being a carrier for medicine.  Lately, increased rates of antibiotic resistant infections have led to a dramatic decrease in the effectiveness of almost all conventional drugs. Long live the honey bee! Traditional folk healers have talked about the virtues of honey for treating infections while conventionally trained physicians have long dismissed these claims. Finally there is a bit of science supporting the claims that honey just might have some effect after all.Honey bee

Citation Link:
Kwakman PHS et al. Medical-grade honey kills antibiotic-resistant bacteria in vitro and eradicates skin colonization. Clin Infect Dis 2008 Jun 1; 46:1677

-Dr. Jake Felice

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Cannabis relieves autism

Cannabis relieves autism

Could cannabis be helpful in the treatment of autism?  We know that the endocannabinoid system can be used to help various neurological and psychological disorder.  A new study shows promise for the treatment of autism in humans.  In an animal model of autism the endocannabinoid system was significantly impaired. Researchers wrote that this raises “the possibility that alterations in endocannabinoid signalling may contribute to autism pathophysiology.”  Fascinating!

Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University Medical School, USA.
Földy C, et al. Neuron 2013;78(3):498-509.

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Illinois likely to be the next state to legalize cannabis as medicine

Illinois likely to be the next state to legalize cannabis as medicine

By Joanne von Alroth

SPRINGFIELD, Illinois | Fri May 17, 2013 4:12pm EDT

(Reuters) – The Illinois Senate on Friday voted to approve the use of marijuana for medical purposes, which if signed into law would make it the second-most-populous state in the nation after California to allow the drug’s use for medical purposes.

The bill, approved by the Illinois House in April, now moves to Governor Pat Quinn’s desk to await his signature. Quinn has indicated he is sympathetic to the bill, especially as it would benefit injured veterans.

“We fully expect Gov. Quinn to do the compassionate thing and sign the bill,” said Dan Riffle, deputy director of government relations for the Washington-based Marijuana Policy Project.

Riffle said marijuana has proven medical benefits and there is broad public and legislative support for its medical use.

The Illinois bill passed by a vote of 35-21 after an emotional, hour-long debate in which some Republicans said they opposed legalizing medical marijuana because it could be a “gateway drug” to abuse of other illegal substances.

Others said they were not convinced that the benefits of smoking marijuana for certain medical conditions outweighed the potential negative consequences.

Democratic State Senator Bill Haine, a former county prosecutor and the bill’s sponsor, said it is the toughest in the nation. He noted that doctors’ groups had endorsed the bill.

“It is a substance which is much more benign than powerful prescription drugs such as Oxycontin, Vicodin and the rest,” Haine said, referring to frequently abused painkillers. “The scourge of these drugs is well-known. This is not true of the medical use of marijuana.”

Eighteen states and the District of Columbia have legalized medical marijuana, according to Riffle. The Project does not count Maryland, since its law requires the participation of academic medical centers and will not be implemented until 2015. Colorado and Washington state voters decided last fall to allow recreational use of cannabis.

Under the four-year pilot program outlined in the Illinois bill, patients would have to be diagnosed with one of 33 debilitating medical conditions, such as cancer, multiple sclerosis or HIV/AIDS. Patients must register with the state’s health department and have written certification from their physicians.

Patients would be limited to 2.5 ounces (70 grams) of marijuana every two weeks. The marijuana must be grown and distributed in Illinois, kept in a closed container, and not used in public or in front of minors.

Those who use, grow or sell the drug must be fingerprinted and undergo background checks. Landlords and employers could ban its use on their property. Users suspected of driving under the influence face the loss of not only their driving privileges, but also their marijuana-use permits.

Under U.S. federal law, marijuana is considered an addictive substance and distribution is a federal offense. Federal law prohibits physicians from writing prescriptions, so many have issued “referrals” or “recommendations.”

The administration of President Barack Obama has discouraged federal prosecutors from pursuing people who distribute marijuana for medical purposes under state laws.

Riffle said that New Hampshire and New York are the next states that could legalize medical marijuana.

(Additional reporting by Mary Wisniewski in Chicago; editing by Greg McCune, Gerald E. McCormick and Matthew Lewis)

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