Cannabis

Cannabis for migraines – a history of use in early 20th century medicine

Cannabis for migraines – a history of use in early 20th century medicine

For those of you interested in cannabis as a treatment for migraine headache, here’s an interesting video.  Dr. David Bearman discusses the early historical use of cannabis for migraine in the United States.  Enjoy, -Dr. Jake Felice

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If you think drug companies want to make you healthy, watch this

If you think drug companies want to make you healthy, watch this

The topic of this video by Glen Olsen is one of the reasons why whole plant cannabis is so important – nobody has ever died from cannabis toxicity ever, and it is patent-free, affordable medicine for the people.  There are no patents for cannabis, and in the great state of Washington, patients with qualifying conditions are allowed to grow their own medicine, making it affordable even for people in the lowest income bracket.  I believe that a huge part of the push back against medical cannabis is because it dramatically reduces patient’s dependence on pharmaceutical drugs.

Nobody has ever died from an overdose of cannabis ever and there is no pain relieving medicine less toxic than cannabis.  Additionally, it is now fairly accepted that cannabis smoke is much less carcinogenic than tobacco smoke.  Let’s stop this nonsense and madness and heal our culture together.  Cannabis is good medicine and even very poor people can afford it in places where it is now legal.

-Dr. Jake Felice

 

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Medical marijuana and breast cancer – new research gives hope

Medical marijuana and breast cancer – new research gives hope

Chemo agents used to treat cancer are notoriously toxic to cancer patients.  Cannabis and cannabinoids such as CBD are at the forefront in the search for cancer cures, based not only on their potential effectiveness, but also on their extremely low toxicity.   -Dr. Jake Felice

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Is it legal to fly with cannabis?

Is it legal to fly with cannabis?

By Ben Livingston at The Stranger

Last October, medical pot patient Lori—who asked that we not use her last name since she can be fired for using marijuana—flew from Sea-Tac Airport to California while carrying her stash. “I didn’t want to get busted for smuggling or anything, so I called the TSA officer over, gave him my license, and let him know I was traveling with marijuana. He said, ‘no problem,’ and ushered me right through.”

Last month, she did the same thing at Sea-Tac Airport, but instead of allowing her past security without a scene, the screener pulled her aside and called in a TSA manager, who then called in the Port of Seattle police.

“They took a whole police report, but they didn’t confiscate anything,” Lori explains. “They told me that in three or four weeks I might get a letter from the prosecutor’s office, and there might be a fine.”

But Port of Seattle police sergeant Jason Coke is surprised by the case. “As far as we’re concerned, [cannabis] is personal property,” he says. Although certain personal property is banned on airplanes, he explains, pot isn’t, assuming it weighs less than the legal possession limit.

“This isn’t illegal for them to fly with,” Coke says.

Coke looked up Lori’s case and found records of her driver’s license, boarding pass, medical cannabis authorization, and stash of pot. He says port police generally report case outcomes to the TSA, and officers document the amount of pot—and that the person was legally entitled to possess it—to show the federal agency that police have done their due diligence, despite letting most fliers keep their cannabis. In Lori’s case, no report was sent to the King County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office, and he assures me the port police will do no such thing.

TSA spokeswoman Lorie Dankers says airport screeners don’t specifically search for illegal drugs. “If an officer discovers an item that may violate the law during security screening, even in states where marijuana is legal, TSA will refer the matter to law enforcement to make a determination on how to proceed.”

Sergeant Coke suggests a few practical tips when flying with cannabis: Don’t draw attention to yourself. Don’t have outstanding warrants. Carry it on, don’t check it—proving you qualify to legally possess pot is easier in person. And allow for an extra half-hour in case, as with Lori, police want to photograph your stash.

 

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How to beat a urinalysis

How to beat a urinalysis

Urinalysis is so easily beaten by many common methods. There are three methods to beat a urinalysis, a spike, a dilution, and a substitution. Check out this video for more information.  These drug tests simply don’t work because they are so easy to beat. Is it time for employers to reconsider drug testing? Pay attention, this valuable information could mean whether you’re employed or not. -Dr. Jake Felice

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American Drug War 2: Cannabis Destiny video

American Drug War 2: Cannabis Destiny video

Enjoy this brief video.  -Dr. Jake Felice

American Drug War II is a sequel to the original American Drug War film, which was released in 2006 and premiered on Showtime in 2008. That film won film festival awards including Best Documentary at the Silver Lake Film Festival, Los Angeles, CA in 2007 and Best Documentary at the DIY Film Festival, Hollywood, CA in 2007.

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