Cannabis

Cannabis laws have no measurable impact on teen usage rates

Cannabis laws have no measurable impact on teen usage rates

This study’s findings rebut the repeated claims from prohibition supporters that the passage of medical cannabis laws increase teen use.

Scientists “found no evidence of intermediate-term effects of passage of state MMLs (medical marijuana laws) on the prevalence or frequency of adolescent nonmedical marijuana use in the states evaluated.”  Again from the study:  Difference-in-differences estimates suggested that passing MMLs (medical marijuana laws) decreased past-month use among adolescents … and had no discernible effect on the perceived riskiness of monthly use. … [These] estimates suggest that reported adolescent marijuana use may actually decrease following the passing of medical marijuana laws.”

For those readers who are research nerds, supporting data from peer reviewed medical literature can be viewed here, and here.

Medical marijuana laws do not increase teen use, rather it is the social use of cannabis in a black market setting that contributes to teen drug use.  Legal cannabis is the best way to protect our children from the black market.

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Why vaporization is one of the healthiest ways to use cannabis

Why vaporization is one of the healthiest ways to use cannabis

There has been a lot of concern about the health hazards of smoking cannabis as medicine. Luckily, you don’t have to smoke cannabis to get medical relief. Cannabis vaporizers give the same biological effect as smoking, but without harmful toxins.

Cannabis vaporizers allow patients to inhale steam, and not the smoke of active cannabinoids including CBD, while avoiding harmful smoke toxins. To do this, vaporizers heat cannabis to well below the temperature where fire and smoke are produced. And even though there is no smoke, the benefits of CBD, THC and other medically active cannabinoids are inhaled by the patient, with none of the carcinogenic tars and noxious gases that are found in smoking.

Many medical marijuana patients who find smoking cannabis irritating report effective relief inhaling through vaporizers. Patients who are concerned about the respiratory hazards of smoking are strongly advised to avoid smoking and use vaporizers.

As a note on cannabis smoke and cancer, there exists no epidemiological evidence that marijuana smokers face a higher risk of smoking-related cancers. For further information on this interesting topic, see these links here, and here.

Click these links for more information on the safety of vaporizing medicinal cannabis: Citation 1, Citation 2, Citation 3, Citation 4, Citation 5, Citation 6

 

©2011 J. F. Felice, ND

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Would prohibition be possible if cannabis was essential rather than illegal?

Would prohibition be possible if cannabis was essential rather than illegal?

Cannabis is the only agricultural crop that produces enough atmospheric monoterpenes to replace what’s been lost, in the time that we may have left to avoid extinction. Cannabis makes four times as much paper of higher quality than do trees. Cannabis is also the only common seed with three essential fatty acids, and the best available source of organic vegetable protein on Earth. Once the relationship between Cannabis and climate change has been made, then it will become obvious that our species must achieve a polar shift in values, in record time.

CO2worksThe boreal forests encircling the planet used to produce enough atmospheric aerosols (called “monoterpenes”) to protect the planet from solar UV-B radiation. Half of the northern forest regions have been cut, mostly to make paper. The rest of the trees are dying from continued logging, insect pest infestation and global temperature increase.

Time is the limiting factor in the equation of survival. We have nothing to fear but the atmosphere itself. If we fail to resolve problems of climate change then it won’t matter very much what we do mange to figure out.

Source: http://www.ted.com/conversations/10021/what_if_the_cannabis_plant_was.html

 

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Rainbow Gathering elder Harry Riverbottom teaches the old knowledge

Rainbow Gathering elder Harry Riverbottom teaches the old knowledge

This video amazed me and I think you will like it too..

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Cannabis relieves autism

Cannabis relieves autism

Could cannabis be helpful in the treatment of autism?  We know that the endocannabinoid system can be used to help various neurological and psychological disorder.  A new study shows promise for the treatment of autism in humans.  In an animal model of autism the endocannabinoid system was significantly impaired. Researchers wrote that this raises “the possibility that alterations in endocannabinoid signalling may contribute to autism pathophysiology.”  Fascinating!

Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University Medical School, USA.
Földy C, et al. Neuron 2013;78(3):498-509.

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Illinois likely to be the next state to legalize cannabis as medicine

Illinois likely to be the next state to legalize cannabis as medicine

By Joanne von Alroth

SPRINGFIELD, Illinois | Fri May 17, 2013 4:12pm EDT

(Reuters) – The Illinois Senate on Friday voted to approve the use of marijuana for medical purposes, which if signed into law would make it the second-most-populous state in the nation after California to allow the drug’s use for medical purposes.

The bill, approved by the Illinois House in April, now moves to Governor Pat Quinn’s desk to await his signature. Quinn has indicated he is sympathetic to the bill, especially as it would benefit injured veterans.

“We fully expect Gov. Quinn to do the compassionate thing and sign the bill,” said Dan Riffle, deputy director of government relations for the Washington-based Marijuana Policy Project.

Riffle said marijuana has proven medical benefits and there is broad public and legislative support for its medical use.

The Illinois bill passed by a vote of 35-21 after an emotional, hour-long debate in which some Republicans said they opposed legalizing medical marijuana because it could be a “gateway drug” to abuse of other illegal substances.

Others said they were not convinced that the benefits of smoking marijuana for certain medical conditions outweighed the potential negative consequences.

Democratic State Senator Bill Haine, a former county prosecutor and the bill’s sponsor, said it is the toughest in the nation. He noted that doctors’ groups had endorsed the bill.

“It is a substance which is much more benign than powerful prescription drugs such as Oxycontin, Vicodin and the rest,” Haine said, referring to frequently abused painkillers. “The scourge of these drugs is well-known. This is not true of the medical use of marijuana.”

Eighteen states and the District of Columbia have legalized medical marijuana, according to Riffle. The Project does not count Maryland, since its law requires the participation of academic medical centers and will not be implemented until 2015. Colorado and Washington state voters decided last fall to allow recreational use of cannabis.

Under the four-year pilot program outlined in the Illinois bill, patients would have to be diagnosed with one of 33 debilitating medical conditions, such as cancer, multiple sclerosis or HIV/AIDS. Patients must register with the state’s health department and have written certification from their physicians.

Patients would be limited to 2.5 ounces (70 grams) of marijuana every two weeks. The marijuana must be grown and distributed in Illinois, kept in a closed container, and not used in public or in front of minors.

Those who use, grow or sell the drug must be fingerprinted and undergo background checks. Landlords and employers could ban its use on their property. Users suspected of driving under the influence face the loss of not only their driving privileges, but also their marijuana-use permits.

Under U.S. federal law, marijuana is considered an addictive substance and distribution is a federal offense. Federal law prohibits physicians from writing prescriptions, so many have issued “referrals” or “recommendations.”

The administration of President Barack Obama has discouraged federal prosecutors from pursuing people who distribute marijuana for medical purposes under state laws.

Riffle said that New Hampshire and New York are the next states that could legalize medical marijuana.

(Additional reporting by Mary Wisniewski in Chicago; editing by Greg McCune, Gerald E. McCormick and Matthew Lewis)

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