MS

Dr. Jake Felice speaks to NPR listeners about cannabis on 90.7 FM KSER

Dr. Jake Felice speaks to NPR listeners about cannabis on 90.7 FM KSER

Click on the player below to play the show! This radio show is a great learning opportunity for those interested in more detail regarding medical cannabis.  Check out Dr. Jake Felice discussing cannabis during the evening commute on NPR 90.7 FM KSER.  Topics include cannabis for PTSD, the use of topical cannabis, cannabis edibles, cannabis for arthritis, MS, Parkinson’s disease, as well as an in depth discussion of terpenes, CBD, cannabis delivery methods, and how to find pure, properly labeled cannabis.  Thanks to the shows host, Dr. Rebecca Dirks, as well as to Dr. Kasra Pournadaeli and KSER 90.7 FM Marysville.

Share

Patients say ‘yes’ to cannabis for MS

Patients say ‘yes’ to cannabis for MS

The science supporting the use of cannabis for Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is absolutely compelling.  Click here for a list of peer reviewed scientific references.

Patients everywhere should have the right to access the best medicine for their illness.  As of now, 20 states now have medical cannabis laws for patients who need safe non-toxic cannabis for their health conditions.

This video highlights the inspirational story of Gary Cooper, an MS patient.  His story, more than all of the scientific evidence referenced above makes a compelling case for the use of low-toxic medical cannabis.

Gary states about cannabis:  “It takes away my discomfort, it enhances my very being.”

Multiple Sclerosis is an autoimmune disease in which the body’s own immune system attacks the central nervous system causing inflammation, muscle spasm and loss of motor coordination, as well as muscle weakness.  Over years, the disease progresses, and MS patients can become permanently disabled.  Multiple sclerosis is typically a progressive disease and it can be fatal.  Medical cannabis can be very helpful for MS.  According to the US National Multiple Sclerosis Society, 200 people are diagnosed every week with MS in the United States, and it most frequently targets those 20 to 40 years of age.  Multiple Sclerosis is particularly prevalent in the Pacific Northwest.

My patients with MS find remarkable benefits from it’s low toxic properties.  I hope that you enjoyed this post, please feel free to comment as I’d love to hear from you.  In health,  -Dr. Jake Felice

Share

Hemp oil improves MS parameters

Hemp oil improves MS parameters

From NORML:

Tabriz, Iran: The consumption of hemp seed nutritional oil, in conjunction with the intake of evening primrose oils and a restricted diet high in hot-natured foods (such as pepper) and low in saturated fats and sugars, is associated with “significant improvement” in symptom management and immunological characteristics in subjects with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to clinical trial data published in the current issue of the scientific journal BioImpacts.

Researchers at the Tabriz University of Medical Sciences in Iran assessed the impact of hemp seed oil, evening primrose oils, and a restricted diet in 23 patients diagnosed with relapsing remitting MS. They reported that participants at the study’s completion “were healthier in comparison to baseline” and that “clinical and immunological parameters showed improvement in the patients after the intervention.” Authors acknowledged that hemp seed oil possesses potent antioxidative properties and also likely acts on specific signaling pathways that regulate inflammatory responses – two characteristics that would presumably make it beneficial in the treatment of MS.

Authors concluded: “After six months, significant improvements in extended disability status score were found. … Our data demonstrated that co-supplemented hemp seed and evening primrose oils with hot-natured diet intervention may decrease the risk of developing MS.”

Previously published clinical trials assessing the impact of inhaled cannabis and extracted organic cannabinoids in patients with MS have demonstrated that plant cannabinoids can alleviate disease symptoms – such as involuntary spasticity, neuropathy, and bladder dysfunction – and, in some subjects, may actually moderate disease progression. Nonetheless, the National MS Society shares little enthusiasm for the therapeutic use of either cannabis or cannabis-derived products as a treatment option for MS patients, stating on its website: “[B]ased on the studies to date – and the fact that long-term use of marijuana may be associated with significant, serious side effects – it is the opinion of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society’s Medical Advisory Board that there are currently insufficient data to recommend marijuana or its derivatives as a treatment for MS symptoms.”

 

Share